Resurrection Jesus Seminar

From Faith Futures
Jump to: navigation, search

This page is part of the Jesus Database project.


Selected details from the Jesus Seminar voting on the Easter Tradition

The March 1995 meeting of the Seminar considered the Resurrection traditions. Extensive information on the voting results, which were expressed partly as assessments of the texts and partly as statements about the literary, historical and theological, was published in Forum 10,3-4.

A selection of the results will be listed here. The color of the text represents the final oputocme of the voting of the particular item, with the weighted average being show in square brackets.


  • James (the apostle) had at least one visionary religious experience, which he came to regard as an appearance of the risen Jesus. [0.43]
  • John (the apostle) had at least one visionary religious experience, which he came to regard as an appearance of the risen Jesus. [0.40]
  • A group known as "the Twelve" had at least one visionary religious experience, which it came to regard as an appearance of the risen Jesus. [0.27]
  • A group known as "the apostles" had at least one visionary religious experience, which it came to regard as an appearance of the risen Jesus. [0.24]
  • The formation of the appearance traditions mentioned in 1 Cor 15:3-8 falls into the time between 30 and 33 CE. [0.74]
  • The Gospel of Peter independently developed earlier exegetical traditions already in use in early Christian communities; it is not derived from the New Testament gospels. [0.43]
  • Matt 28:16-20 [0.09]
  • Luke 24:33b-49 [0.06]
  • John 20:19-23 [0.08]
  • With respect to content, the appearance stories in the gospels appear to be connected with (a) the commission to preach the gospel, (b) the authorization to found a community of believers, (c) the legitimization of leaders, and (d) the plan of salvation history. [0.96]
  • Accounts of the appearances (of the risen Jesus) in the gospels are secondary kerygmatic narrative expressions of resurrection faith made by relatively late communities. [0.81]